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Graduate certificate

credits 18 | cost/credit $450 | completion (1 year)

The genetics and genomics graduate certificate is designed to be completed in 1 year (3 semesters), taking one 7- or 8-week course at a time. Courses are mostly asynchronous (which means you can complete the majority of the classwork on your own schedule), enabling you to balance your graduate classes with your other responsibilities at work and at home.

Applicants must have at least a bachelor's degree and have taken 3 semesters of natural sciences courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Applicants also must have at least 2 years of work experience in a healthcare setting or, absent that, permission to enroll from the program coordinator.

The program starts in the fall semester, and courses must be taken in the order listed below. Graduates of the certificate program will be able to:

  1. Use and explain genetics and genomics concepts
  2. Differentiate between genetic predisposition and disease diagnosis
  3. Describe and explain the interaction of genetics, environmental, genomic and behavioral factors in predisposition of disease, onset of disease, response to treatment and maintenance of health
  4. Identify and synthesize the ethical, legal, social, cultural, economic and psychological issues for patients undergoing or considering genetic testing

Courses

BIO 510 - Molecular and Biochemical Genetics and Genomics

(3 credits) Students will learn about the molecular structure of DNA, RNA, and protein and the processes of the central dogma of biology: replication, transcription, and translation. We will learn the basic anatomy of a gene and how gene structure regulates gene expression. We will examine, in depth, the inheritance of genes during eukaryotic cell division and sexual reproduction and the consequences of mutation and DNA repair. We will compare and contrast genetics and genomics and examine the molecular structure of the human genome. Throughout the course we will consider the genetic basis of inherited disease and relate this to the central dogma of biology and also carefully examine ethical issues raised by modern genetics.

(3 credits) Students will learn about the molecular structure of DNA, RNA, and protein and the processes of the central dogma of biology: replication, transcription, and translation. We will learn the basic anatomy of a gene and how gene structure regulates gene expression. We will examine, in depth, the inheritance of genes during eukaryotic cell division and sexual reproduction and the consequences of mutation and DNA repair. We will compare and contrast genetics and genomics and examine the molecular structure of the human genome. Throughout the course we will consider the genetic basis of inherited disease and relate this to the central dogma of biology and also carefully examine ethical issues raised by modern genetics.

BIO 520 - Heredity, Human Genetics and Genomics

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of molecular genetics, this course focuses on heredity. Students will review Mendelian genetics with applications to human genetics and genomics and will connect Mendelian inheritance of dominant and recessive traits to meiosis and gamete formation. Students will learn how to construct a pedigree from a family history, to analyze a pedigree, and to explain a pedigree to patients. Students will also learn about extensions of Mendelian genetics including aneuploidy, mosaicism, pleiotrophy, multifactorial traits, penetrance, and expressivity. Students will consider the complex relationship between genes, the environment, and the interactions of other genes in the context of genomics in addition to the relationship between phenotype and genotype and the impact of genetics on fetal development.

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of molecular genetics, this course focuses on heredity. Students will review Mendelian genetics with applications to human genetics and genomics and will connect Mendelian inheritance of dominant and recessive traits to meiosis and gamete formation. Students will learn how to construct a pedigree from a family history, to analyze a pedigree, and to explain a pedigree to patients. Students will also learn about extensions of Mendelian genetics including aneuploidy, mosaicism, pleiotrophy, multifactorial traits, penetrance, and expressivity. Students will consider the complex relationship between genes, the environment, and the interactions of other genes in the context of genomics in addition to the relationship between phenotype and genotype and the impact of genetics on fetal development.

BIO 610 - Population and Quantitative Genetics and Genomics

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of molecular and Mendelian genetics, this course focuses on the genetics and genomics of populations. Both single-gene and complex diseases will be covered. Students will use statistics and evaluate experimental design from population studies in order to draw conclusions about individual disease risk.

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of molecular and Mendelian genetics, this course focuses on the genetics and genomics of populations. Both single-gene and complex diseases will be covered. Students will use statistics and evaluate experimental design from population studies in order to draw conclusions about individual disease risk.

BIO 620 - Technological Applications of Personalized Medicine

(3 credits) This course focuses on the applications of personalized medicine. Students will learn about the Human Genome Project and its implications for human health and disease. Comparative and functional genomics, transcriptosomics, and proteomics will be studied. Students will learn how genomes are sequenced and data bases are mined (bioinformatics). Students will learn how genetic testing and screening is done and the implications of genetic testing and screening for patients. Ethical, social, cultural, and legal implications of genomic medicine will be considered.

(3 credits) This course focuses on the applications of personalized medicine. Students will learn about the Human Genome Project and its implications for human health and disease. Comparative and functional genomics, transcriptosomics, and proteomics will be studied. Students will learn how genomes are sequenced and data bases are mined (bioinformatics). Students will learn how genetic testing and screening is done and the implications of genetic testing and screening for patients. Ethical, social, cultural, and legal implications of genomic medicine will be considered.

BIO 630 - Therapeutiic Modalities in Genetic and Genomic Medicine

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of molecular and Mendelian genetics, this course focuses on pharmacogenetics and the use of gene therapy in human health.

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of molecular and Mendelian genetics, this course focuses on pharmacogenetics and the use of gene therapy in human health.

BIO 640 - Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Genetic and Genomic Medicine

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of genetics and genomics, this course focuses on the ethical, legal, cultural, economic, psychological, and social implications of genetic and genomic medicine.

(3 credits) Building on the foundation of genetics and genomics, this course focuses on the ethical, legal, cultural, economic, psychological, and social implications of genetic and genomic medicine.

Total Credits: 18 credit hours

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